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Seen vs scene

Seen is the past participle of see, which means to perceive the world through the eyes, to perceive the world through the sense of sight. See also means to understand, to visit a person or a place, to experience, to court someone, to look up. See is one of the one thousand most frequently used words in the English language according to the Oxford English Dictionary. Seen comes from the Middle English word sein.

Scene is the place where something occurs. Scene may also refer to a specific incident, an area of specific interest, a public exhibition of anger or violence, a landscape. A scene may also refer to a portion of a novel or play in which the action depicts one event and is usually set in one place. Scene is also one of the one thousand most frequently used words in the English language according to the Oxford English Dictionary. The word scene comes from the Greek word skene which means that which is represented on stage.


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Examples

Prosecutors detained two men seen on security footage alongside the metro and airport suicide bombers on April 8, meaning all known Brussels bombings suspects are dead or in custody. (Reuters)

An explosion rocked central Kabul early on Tuesday and a thick plume of black smoke could be seen rising from the vicinity of the sprawling US embassy in the Afghan capital, Reuters witnesses said, but there was no immediate report of casualties. (The Jerusalem Post)

Clinton was with New York Sen. Chuck Schumer at a stop outside of Kung Fu Tea in Flushing when she was asked if she has seen the 28 pages whether they should be de-classified. (The Daily Caller)

Research by the University of Leicester has found that a much smaller proportion of drivers blamed drinking, lack of insurance or panic for their decision to flee the scene. (The Financial Times)

Saveur, a gourmet food and wine magazine and website, is dedicating the month of April to New Jersey’s culinary scene. (Asbury Park Press)

And now, EW has an exclusive sneak peek of a deleted scene that gives more detail to Charlotte’s tangled web of lies. (Entertainment Weekly)

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