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Red vs read

Red and read are two words that are pronounced in the same way but mean two different things. In addition, read is one of those strange words that when used as a verb can be pronounced in two different ways, changing the tense. We’ll look at the meaning of the words red and read and some examples of their use.

Red is a color, the word red may be used as an adjective or as a noun. Red is one of the primary colors, which are the three basic colors from which all other colors may be mixed. The primary colors are red, blue and yellow. Red is the color of blood and the color of heat or fire, it is often used to describe things that are violent, hot or alarming. Related words are redder, reddest.


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Read is the past tense of read, it is pronounced in the same way as the word red. The present tense, read, is pronounced as reed, though it is spelled in the same manner as the past tense, read. Read means to have comprehended the symbols composing printed or written matter and interpreted them into information. Read may also be used figuratively to mean to have observed and understood a person or a situation. Whether the word read is meant to represent the present tense or the past tense can only be known by the context of the sentence.

Examples

And now it’s time for the Red Dwarf boys to make their comeback, as series XI hits screens this month after a four-year hiatus. (The Daily Mail)

It’s just after noon on Tuesday, and residents of the emergency flood shelter at the Heymann Performing Arts Center in Lafayette have begun asking volunteers of the American Red Cross when lunch will be served. (The Daily Advertiser)

Clive James: ‘People have come to talk about my book. Sadly, not all of them have read it’ (The Guardian)

After reading a hundred books on business, fitness and nutrition last year, Marhefka said he wanted to master specific things, so this year he has read “How to Win Friends and Influence People” 14 times. (The Gainesville Sun)

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