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Pros vs prose

  • Pros and prose are two words that are pronounced in the same way but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which means they are homophones. We will examine the definitions of pros and prose, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.

    Pros is the plural form of pro, which may mean a professional, someone who is extremely proficient in something. Pro may also mean to be in favor of something or an argument in favor of something. Pro may be used as a noun, adjective or adverb. The word pro as an abbreviation of the word professional was first used in the late 1800s. The word pro meaning to be in favor of something is derived from the Latin word pro which means on behalf of.

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    Prose is a rendering of language in written or spoken form without a structured meter. This is in contrast to poetry, which is written with structured meter and sometimes rhyme. Prose may be used as a noun and infrequently, as a verb. Related words are proses, prosed, prosing. The word prose is a mass noun, which means it signifies something that is uncountable and does not generally have a plural form. The word prose is derived from the Latin term prosa oratio which means plain speech.

    Examples

    Let’s explain what that means, the pros/cons of data democratization and the tech innovation that has transpired to support this effort. (Forbes Magazine)

    Pros north of the Mason-Dixon Line could even winter in warmer climates, teaching on sun-splashed ranges year-round when $250 a month could fetch a furnished apartment in Palm Springs. (The Minneapolis Star Tribune)

    This summer, the 27-year-old takes over as creative director for Brews & Prose, the author showcase on the first Tuesday of every month at Market Garden Brewery. (Cleveland Magazine)

    The asymmetric prose may be forgiven, considering it becomes clear the narrator—a young boy named Jate Tavino—is skull-plated, growth-stunted and generally “rattled” after a childhood traffic accident in his fictional Rhode Island hometown of Sowams. (The Idaho Mountain Express)

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