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Knew vs new

Knew is the past tense of the verb know, which means to be certain of a particular truth or fact, to be acquainted or familiar with, to understand or experience. Related words are knows, knowing, knowable. Knew comes from the Old English word cneow, the past tense of the Old English word cnawan, which means to know, to acknowledge, to declare.

New means fresh, not previously in existence, recently invented or discovered. New may also mean unused or not previously owned. New is primarily used as an adjective, though occasionally it is used as an adverb in combination of other words. Words related to the word new are newly, newness and newish. New comes from the Old English words neowe and niowe, which mean new, fresh, recent, novel, inexperienced. New is one of the one thousand most frequently used words, according to the Oxford English Dictionary.


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Examples

But those who knew her say she was not, as some have called her, a “recluse”; she did not eschew the company of others. (Time Magazine)

“There is no information that we are aware of that indicates she knew who the attacker was,” Sergeant Sim said. (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Japan knew it would cover Okinawa land restoration costs before ’71 reversion: declassified documents (The Japan Times)

In Rome on Friday, Simone Farelli, a 34-year-old history teacher who was browsing for a new iPhone at an Apple Store, said she “didn’t see why” the company’s standoff with the Federal Bureau of Investigation “would change my mind about buying a new phone.” (The New York Times)

Liverpool new boy Marko Grujic has revealed he has received ‘more offers from girls’ since he signed for the Reds. (The Mirror)

In 1924, a year after founding the Turkish Republic on the ruins of the Ottoman Empire, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the country’s new leader, abolished the Ottoman Caliphate, which had been the last remaining Sunni Islamic Caliphate since 1517. (The New Yorker)

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