Advertisement

Holy vs wholly

  •  
  • Holy and wholly are two words that are pronounced in the same manner but are spelled differently and have different meanings, which makes them homophones. We will examine the definitions of the words holy and wholly, where these words came from and some examples of their use in sentences.

    Holy describes something that is sacred, something that is associated with a deity, something saintly, something deserving reverence and worship. The word holy is derived from the Old English word halig, which means sacred or Godly. Holy is an adjective.

    Advertisement

    Wholly means entirely, in full, completely and in every way. It is believed that the word wholly is derived from the Old English word hallice. Wholly is an adverb. Most words that begin with the phonogram wh are pronounced with the sound hw or w, depending on one’s accent. However, wholly is pronounced in an identical fashion to the word holy.

    Examples

    The Holy Cross School athlete who said he got into a fight after being called a racial slur on Bourbon Street over the weekend surrendered to authorities Wednesday, and his attorneys are hopeful prosecutors will refuse charges against him and two of his friends after they review a cellphone video of the incident and other evidence. (The New Orleans Advocate)

    JEWS AND MUSLIMS FIGHTING OVER HOLY SITES IN ISRAEL ARE BEHIND THE UNESCO WORLD WAR (Newsweek Magazine)

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has said the Republicans’ failure to act on gun violence “is about money”, calling them a “wholly-owned subsidiary” of gun rights lobbying groups. (The Independent)

    AyalaLand Hotels and Resorts Corp. (AHRC) announced on Friday the conclusion of its contract with Marriott International Hotels to manage Cebu City Marriott Hotel by the end of 2017 and the appointment of its wholly-owned Seda to manage the hotel in 2018 after refurbishing the hotel’s rooms and amenities. (The Inquirer)

    Advertisement

    Speak Your Mind

    About Grammarist
    Contact | Privacy policy | Home
    © Copyright 2009-2014 Grammarist