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Clause vs claws

In grammar, a clause is a string of words that includes a subject and a predicate, but is not a full sentence. There are four types of clauses, including 1.) a main clause, which is a clause that may stand on its own 2.) a subordinate clause, which is a clause that is unable to stand on its own 3.) a relative clause, which is a clause that begins with a relative pronoun 4.) a noun clause, which is a clause that functions as a noun. The word clause may also be used to describe a certain section of a legal document or statute. Clause comes from the Old French word clause, which means stipulation.

Claws are horny, pointed nails that protrude from bird, reptile or mammal feet, or the pincers found on crabs, lobsters and other arthropods. Claws may also be used figuratively to describe something that mimics the horny, pointed nails that protrude from animal feet or the pincers found on arthropods. Claws may also be used as a verb to mean to tear at something with one’s claws or fingernails, related words are claw, clawed, clawing. Claws is the plural of claw, derived from the Old English words clawu and clea,  which mean claw or talon.


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Examples

In a fee oil and gas lease, the force majeure clause is designed to protect the lessee from being liable for damages or the lease from terminating for causes beyond the lessee’s control. (The National Law Review)

There are also questions over whether the vote could trigger a material adverse change clause in City deals which could cause their collapse. (The Evening Standard)

I’m Tyga’s girl again: Kylie Jenner wears big cat T-shirt after rapper claws his way back into her life (The Daily Mail)

“I was on my [rear] and being raked with claws and bitten,” wrote Williams. (The Chicago Tribune)

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