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Bite, byte or bight

A bite is a portion that is taken away by the rasping of teeth or the wound left from the rasping of teeth. A bite may also refer to the nibbling of a fish on a lure or bait. Bite may mean a small amount to eat. Bite also functions as a verb to mean to clamp down on something with the teeth or tear something away with the teeth, or the nibbling of a fish on a lure or bait. Related words are bites, bitten, biting. Bite is also used figuratively to mean to take the bait, as well as to describe something that stings or causes pain.

A byte is a unit of computer memory. One byte is usually eight bits and is processed as a single unit of data.


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A bight is the wide indentation in the shoreline of a river, ocean or other body of water. The middle, slack part of a rope is also called the bight.

Examples

The shark’s bite got stuck in the high-density polystyrene foam that fills the Firewire board, and jammed on its balsa wood rail. (The Sydney Morning Herald)

He says the grandmother saw the snake bite the boy, went into cardiac arrest and died a short time later. (The Insurance Journal)

Detria Ward brings a fine edge and bite to Rose – knowing, patient, yet no-nonsense. (The Houston Chronicle)

They were great places to grab a bite and a glass of often generic Sancerre or Beaujolais. (The Los Angeles Times)

North MCD mayor Ravinder Gupta has supporters filming his interviews with TV reporters so that his ‘uncensored’ TV bytes are available on his Facebook page. (The Deccan Herald)

The sole aim of launching bytes.pk was to enable more people to use technology and empower them using it. (The Daily Times)

Two years ago, Dr. Leigh Torres documented 50 blue whales in the South Taranaki Bight, some of New Zealand’s busiest and most industrialized waters. (The National Geographic)

This time, however, it’s also linked by a surface trough to a deeper low that tracked through the bight this week. (The Northern Star)

It appeared that the bight of the rope, as the body fell, instead of stretching out to the full, caught the elbow of one of Joyce’s pinioned arms and broke his fall. (The Galway Advertiser)

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